Courses and Curriculum

TRANSFORM Curriculum

  • The TRANSFORM program has two Certificate tracks: Manufacturing Technology and Manufacturing Innovation.
  • Each track requires 25 semester hours: 12 SH in Fall, 12 SH in Spring, and 1 SH in Summer
  • Students go on an internship during the spring semester. The spring 1SH course is Co-cop dialogue. It is part of the student internship experience. Students will meet periodically in person or remotely to share their internship experiences.
  • The stackable curriculum provides students with other pathways to earn other degrees in the future with focus on manufacturing. Course offerings are flexible and can be taken part-time.

Manufacturing Technology Certificate Program
Manufacturing Innovation Certificate Program

Courses Directory

MN 100: Career Readiness and e-Portfolio
MN 130: Engineering Design I
MN 131A: Manufacturing Technology Fundamentals
MN 131B: Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing
MN 131C: Statistical Process Control and Quality Assurance
MN 132A: Reverse Engineering, 3D Scanning and 3D Printing
MN 132B: Numerical Control Machining
MN 132C: Sustainability and Lifecycle Management
MN 133A: New Product Development
MN 133B: Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals
MN 201: CO-OP Dialogue
MN 205: Supply Chain Management
CS 101A: Making it Happen with Code
CS 101B: Making it Happen with Artifacts
CS 101C: Making it Happen with Robots
CS 101D: Making it Happen with Data
BU 100: Introduction to Business
MG 210: Entrepreneurship

Course Descriptions and Outcomes

MN 100 – Career Readiness and e-Portfolio

Course Description

  • This course prepares students to launch a successful career search. It covers topics such as resume preparation, effective communication skills (both oral and written), and effective interview skills. The course also prepares students to establish an efficient e-portfolio structure that best represents one’s strongest credentials.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will produce a relevant professional resume and cover letter to be used while searching for jobs and internships
  2. Students will demonstrate ability to effectively prepare for an interview, and implement strategies for a successful interview
  3. Students will produce a template that will help them create a portfolio of their course work both electronically and paper to present to potential employers
  4. Students will create a professional electronic presence relevant to Manufacturing / Engineering disciplines
  5. Students will demonstrate ability to complete an internship contract including thorough understanding of establishing internship objectives based on the presented job description
  6. Students will demonstrate information competencies and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner

MN 130 – Engineering Design I

Course Description

  • Presents engineering design case studies for a variety of engineering disciplines and introduces design topics including problem formulation, creativity, specifications, evaluation tools, ergonomics, manufacturing, and ethics. Provides a solid foundation for developing accurate 3D CAD models and 2D representations of parts and assemblies using SolidWorks, a 3D Parametric Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. CAD topics will include hands-on creation and modification of parts, and assemblies in regard to design intent and complete with features, dimensions, relationships and views, and developing 2D representation of 3D parts. Students develop an original design to solve a technical problem and a 3D visualization of the solution using SolidWorks as a term project.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will identify and use mechanical industry standards of practice and common terminology
  2. Students will appropriately select and use manual drafting tools such as the Engineer and Architects scale and calipers to accurately measure existing drawings and physical objects
  3. Students will learn and apply the tools and features of SolidWorks for effective and logical modeling and design of part models, assemblies, and drawings
  4. Students will use 3rd angle projection rules to create accurate orthographic projection sketches (paper and pencil) and SolidWorks drawings
  5. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for CAD and Mechanical Manufacturing applications
  6. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  7. Students will evaluate stakeholder needs for design projects.
  8. Students will apply engineering design methodology and critical thinking to develop an engineering idea from concept to prototype
  9. Students will demonstrate effective teamwork skills by participating in a real world simulated project
  10. Students will demonstrate independence and apply self-directed learning skills by participating in a real-world simulated project
  11. Students will enhance their written and verbal communication skills by participating in a real-world simulated project

MN 131A – Manufacturing Technology Fundamentals

Course Description

  • This course provides an overview of the basic manufacturing fundamentals and concepts. Topics covered include basics of machine tools, basics of machining, and manufacturing processes. Machine tools topic includes machine setup, machine zeros, motion axes, workpiece clamping, and wet/dry machining. Machining topic includes cutting tools materials and types, standard stock shapes, machining parameters, machining quality, stock squaring, home position, toolpaths, and rapid positioning. Manufacturing processes include turning, drilling, milling, and Electric Discharge Machine (EDM). The course also offers an overview of OSHA safety guidelines and requirements.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will identify and use mechanical detailing & manufacturing standards of practice, common terminology, and technical drawing types
  2. Students will use manual drafting tools such as the Engineer scale and calipers to accurately measure existing drawings and physical objects
  3. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for metals, non-metals, mechanical & chemical properties and classification of materials
  4. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  5. Students will evaluate stakeholder needs for design/manufacturing assignments
  6. Students will apply engineering design methodology and critical thinking to develop an engineering idea from concept to prototype

MN 131B – Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing

Course Description

  • This course covers the basics of both conventional and geometric tolerances. Topics include nominal/basic/actual size, hole and shaft, hole and shaft systems, limit dimensions, unilateral/bilateral/symmetric tolerances, material conditions, datum, and datum targets. Other topics include ASME Tolerance Rules, ANSI and ISO Fits, tolerance accumulation, statistical tolerancing, true position. Geometric tolerances include assigning tolerances and interpreting them. Students apply the concepts using commercial CAD/CAM software.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will identify and use mechanical detailing standards of practice, common terminology, and technical drawing types
  2. Students will use manual drafting tools such as the Engineer’s scale and calipers to accurately measure existing drawings and physical objects for correct measuring & tolerances
  3. Students will create and use template files including a title block with appropriate settings
  4. Students will learn and apply the tools and features of SolidWorks for effective and logical drawing creation and file conversion
  5. Students will use 3rd angle projection rules to create accurate orthographic projection, auxiliary, section and detail sketches (paper and pencil) and SolidWorks drawings as well as determine all necessary views for a given drawing
  6. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for CAD and mechanical detailing applications
  7. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  8. Students will gain an understanding of the terms and technologies related to GD & T and the proper techniques to create proper toleranced engineering drawings
  9. Students will apply engineering design methodology and critical thinking to develop an engineering idea from concept to prototype
  10. Students will demonstrate effective teamwork skills by participating in a real world simulated design assignment
  11. Students will demonstrate independence and apply self-directed learning skills by participating in a real world simulated project
  12. Students will enhance their written and verbal communication skills by participating in a real world simulated project

MN 131C – Statistical Process Control and Quality Assurance

Course Description

  • This course covers statistical process control (SPC) and quality assurance (QA) in manufacturing. SPC covers modeling, process quality, control charts, process capability, and acceptance sampling methods, Six Sigma, and Lean Enterprise. Quality assurance covers administrative and procedural activities implemented in a quality to fulfill product requirements, management of the quality of raw materials, assemblies, products and components, production and inspection processes, ISO 9000.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will identify and use mechanical detailing standards of practice and common terminology for Quality Management and Quality Assurance
  2. Students will evaluate and assess scenarios to determine proficiency as it relates to ISO International standards and strategies in quality assurance and management
  3. Students will learn and apply the tools and features of continuous improvement for effective and logical brainstorming, improving quality and effectively understanding quality problems
  4. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for Quality Assurance and Management
  5. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  6. Students will evaluate stakeholder needs for design and evaluation assignments
  7. Students will apply engineering design/manufacturing methodology and critical thinking to develop skills in a manufacturing quality control environment
  8. Students will demonstrate effective teamwork skills by participating in a real world simulated assignment
  9. Students will enhance their written and verbal communication skills by participating in a real world simulated project

MN 132A – Reverse Engineering, 3D Scanning and 3D Printing

Course Description

  • This course introduces the concepts of reverse engineering, a common practice in design and manufacturing. It also covers 3D scanning concepts including 3D point clouds, converting these clouds to CAD surfaces, and filtering techniques. 3D printing concepts include prototyping applications, triangulation (Tessellation) of CAD models, build orientation, support structure, deviation and angle tolerances, and building techniques.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will use 3D technology such as the 3D printer and scanner effectively to reverse engineer and produce working prototypes
  2. Students will evaluate techniques and materials for scanning 3D objects and be able to select appropriate approaches for each
  3. Students will demonstrate effective use of 3D Scans post processing techniques and options
  4. Demonstrate effective use of 3D Printing techniques and options for part and assembly prototyping
  5. Research, identify, discuss and recommend appropriate current technology used for reverse engineering, prototyping and manufacturing
  6. Students will demonstrate information competencies and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner

MN 132B – Numerical Control Machining

Course Description

  • This course introduces the concepts of NC toolpath generation and verification. Other NC machining concepts include zero-radius programming, tool offset, interpolation and canned cycles, NC controllers, G-code and M-code programming. The course focuses on NC turning, drilling, and milling. The course also introduces the concepts and capabilities of computer numerical control machine tools. It also introduces the concepts of machine codes, work offsets, height offsets, machine settings, alarms, and communication. Interpretation of blue prints is also covered. Students gain an understanding of machine shop math, machining processes, and tooling. The course utilizes the Hass Mill and Lathe CNC Simulation controllers.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will use Haas NC machining controller and CAD/CAM standards of practice and common terminology for Numerical Control Machining
  2. Students will demonstrate proficiency in applying ISO International standards and strategies as they relate to quality assurance and machining
  3. Students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the tools and features of continuous improvement, quality control and advanced manufacturing for improving quality
  4. Students will applying QA/QC rules and methods of continuous improvement, CNC and advanced manufacturing to solving quality challenges
  5. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for Quality Assurance and Management
  6. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  7. Students will apply engineering design/manufacturing methodology and critical thinking to develop skills in an advanced manufacturing environment
  8. Students will demonstrate effective teamwork skills by participating in a real world simulated CNC programming assignment
  9. Student’s will demonstrate independence and apply self-directed learning skills by participating in a real world simulated assignment
  10. Students will enhance their written and verbal communication skills by participating in a real world simulated assignment

MN 132C – Sustainability and Lifecycle Management

Course Description

  • This course covers the basics of sustainable (green) design and manufacturing, End-of-life (EOL) processing, lifecycle assessment (LCA), guidelines and principles of sustainability and product lifecycle management (PLM). It also covers impact metrics of carbon footprint, energy consumption, air acidification, water eutrophication, and water footprint. Sustainable design tools and software are discussed.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will identify and use standards of practice and common terminology for green manufacturing, life cycle assessment, and lifecycle management (PLM), and sustainability
  2. Students will learn and apply the tools and features of continuous improvement for effective and logical brainstorming, improving quality and effectively understanding quality problems as it relates to green design/manufacturing
  3. Students will identify, discuss, and recommend appropriate current technology used for sustainability and lifecycle management
  4. Students will demonstrate information competencies, and the ability to use computers and other technologies in an ethical and responsible manner
  5. Students will evaluate stakeholder needs for evaluating green design and end of life processing
  6. Students will apply engineering design/manufacturing methodology and critical thinking to develop skills in a lifecycle management environment
  7. Students will demonstrate effective teamwork skills by participating in a real world simulated assignment
  8. Students will demonstrate independence and apply self-directed learning skills by participating in a real world simulated assignment
  9. Students will enhance their written and verbal communication skills by participating in a real world simulated project

MN 133A – New Product Development

Course Description

  • This course covers the basics of how to create new products and services. Topics include product development process, customer research and needs, concept generation and testing, product specifications and architecture, and patents and intellectual property. Students also learn product prototyping, product launch planning, and market testing. Students apply their course skills to their own product ideas and develop prototypes of these products.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will envision product based solutions to satisfy customer needs
  2. Students will generate conceptual designs to satisfy products’ functional requirements
  3. Students will evaluate alternative product designs against a given set of criteria
  4. Students will understand principles of product design, development, and scale up for production
  5. Students will gain skills to use modern tools necessary for product design and development
  6. Students will gain knowledge of business functions associated with product development and marketing
  7. Students will acquire ability to coordinate multiple interdisciplinary tasks to design and develop products

MN 133B – Lean Six Sigma Fundamentals

Course Description

  • This course covers the fundamentals of lean thinking and six sigma methodology. The course establishes the connection between lean thinking which focuses on waste reduction and six sigma which strives to eliminate product defects. Lean thinking topics include value, value stream mapping, flow, pull, and perfection. Six sigma topics include the five standard steps of six sigma methodology: design, measure, analyze, improve, and control. Students apply the course knowledge to practical problems.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will gain a broad perspective of lean thinking from the enterprise perspective
  2. Students will recognize improvements in the operating and financial performance through lean implementation
  3. Students will develop skills to recognize value added and non-valued-added activities
  4. Students will learn to map the value stream to identify opportunities for improving the value steam
  5. Students will understand flow and pull concepts from learn perspective and learn to implement them in practice
  6. Students will understand the fundamentals of process control and six-sigma practices and their role in eliminating process variation
  7. Students will learn the key elements of a Kaizen process and their usefulness to implement lean concepts

MN 201 – CO-OP Dialogue

Course Description

  • This course provides actual hands-on work experience at companies. Co-op experience of at least 80 hours within a supervised setting is required. While on co-op students will meet periodically in person or remotely during their co-op semester to share their co-op experiences. Students are required to document their experience. Grading is pass/fail.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will gain relevant work experience in a form of an internship at a manufacturing company
  2. Students will learn from internship experience of others in their cohort

MN 205 – Supply Chain Management

Course Description

  • This course focuses on the development and application of decision models in supply chains with emphasis on demand forecasting, aggregate planning, inventory management (cycle and safety), supply network design, transportation, coordination and sourcing. Industry standard tools and techniques will be utilized in building decision models for effective decision making in supply chains. The course also discusses security issues in supply chain networks.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will understad and identify contemporary issues in supply chain management
  2. Students will identify, formulate, and solve supply chain problems
  3. Students will forecast demand and develop aggregate plans in supply chain
  4. Students will model supply chains for performance analysis
  5. Students will apply spreadsheet based tools and techniques for decision making

CS 101A – Making it Happen with Code

Course Description

  • Through a series of projects students are introduced to computational problem solving. Students will create animations, control multimedia displays, provide interactive user experiences, and command mechanical artifacts. Behind the scenes they will be using variables, control structures, loops and functions as they develop programs to perform these tasks.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will apply a creative development process when creating computational artifacts
  2. Students will create a computational artifact using computing tools and techniques to solve a problem
  3. Students will collaborate in the creation of computational artifacts
  4. Students will develop an algorithm for implementation in a program
  5. Students will collaborate to develop a program to solve a problem

CS 101B – Making it Happen with Artifacts

Course Description

  • Through a series of projects students are introduced to the devices which they can control with their code. They build interactive artifacts with motors, sensors, lights, speakers, and switches inside. Then they bring their creations to life by sending commands to micro-controllers.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will have hands-on experience with embedded computing and digital technology
  2. Students will understand the use of sensors, motors and interactive algorithms
  3. Students will collaborate with others to design, build and program an interactive artifact

CS 101C – Making it Happen with Robots

Course Description

  • Through a series of projects students control the behavior of a mobile robot as it moves around, senses its environment, and performs various tasks.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will understand the interdisciplinary field of robotics and its impact on society
  2. Students will use a programming language to direct the behavior of a robot
  3. Students will program the robot to perform basic functions successfully
  4. Students will collaborate with others to analyze tasks and solve problems effectively

CS 101D – Making it Happen with Data

Course Description

  • This course explores different ways in which data can be manipulated and visualized to help with design decisions. At the core of these decisions is the data that is needed to create usable artifacts, along with associated costs. Students learn to evaluate designs via effective visualization techniques.

Course Outcomes

  1. Students will use computational tools to process data and extract information and knowledge
  2. Students will use computational tools to process information, find patterns, and test hypotheses to gain insight and knowledge
  3. Students will extract information from data to discover and explain connections, patterns, or trends
  4. Students will use computer programs to visualize data and answer questions or confirm assumptions

BU 100 – Introduction to Business

Course Description

  • Introduction to the basic business functions of Small Business Management, Marketing, Finance, and Information Management and to the forms of business ownership. Elementary study of the separate disciplines of a business and how they are interrelated with one another, for the benefit of the customer/buyer and within the context of free-market pricing principles and government regulation. Introduction to the relevance of accessing data and information, critical analysis and use for business problem solving, and the importance of communication to business practices. Course provides the basis for students’ decisions to elect more advanced courses, depending upon their interests. Lecture/Group & individual out of class work.

MG 210 – Entrepreneurship

Course Description

  • The Entrepreneurship course prepares students who have sound business ideas and/or well developed business plans to start, develop, finance, market, manage, and launch a new business. This course gives students the skills and knowledge they need to master the requirements of all the stages of launching a new business and the opportunity to build and implement a new business. The course has a classroom component in which students conduct their academic studies and an experiential component that allows students to develop and implement their business strategies. (This will include selecting the ownership method, securing financing, developing marketing techniques, preparing financial statements and budgets, etc.) A mentoring feature is included that guides students through the entire entrepreneurial process. The outcome of this course is to launch of a new business.

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Sat 23

Upcoming Events

Tue 26

Curley Afterschool Program (CEP)

September 26
Organizers: Center for STEM Education
617-373-8380
and STEMout
Sat 30

BPS Career Fair

September 30 @ 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Organizer: Boston Public Schools
(617) 635-9000
Oct 03